Until now an estimated total of 30.000 km of cable has been recovered but still 94% of unused cables are lying on the seabed together with 72.000 repeaters and this number is growing every year.

Routes are getting more and more congested, (potential) liabilities are increasing, political- and environmental understanding are changing and this 'waste' represents a potential value of several billions of USD of metals and plastics.

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deep sea cable recovery

deep sea cable recovery

  • Of any cable-type or length, at depths ranging from 1 to 7 km
  • From every ocean, in all weather conditions
  • In accordance with all relevant environmental legislation and ICPC recommendations
  • By a highly qualified crew, using high-standard recovery equipment
training / r&d

training / r&d

  • In-house training of cable recovery crews
  • In-house research and development department
management

management

  • Vessel management
  • Financial management
  • Crew management
end to end service

end to end service

  • Cost effective recycling solutions for re-use of materials
  • Cost effective recycling solutions for re-deployment of cable systems (fibre optic cables and repeaters)
  • Recovery, testing and transport of fibre optic cable systems for re-deployment
  • Project planning (including route planning, cable recovery plans, communication with cable owners in recovery area)
  • Daily communication with cable owners and authorities about the recovery proceedings
  • Transport and depot services all around the world
  • Advice about various recycling options

TAGIDE
Cable description unarmored polyethylene coaxial Linking France - Portugal Cable owner Subsea Environmental Services Ltd. Vessel CRS Rebecca Captains V. Babchynsky , K.Magden KM recovered 480 Tonnage recovered 720 Duration project October 2015 - November 2015 Waterdepth 1.000 - 3.000 meters Nr. of repeaters planned 35
TAGIDE
Cable description unarmored polyethylene coaxial Linking France - Portugal Cable owner Subsea Environmental Services Ltd. Vessel CRS Rebecca Captains Captain V. Babchynsky and Captain A. Dryga KM recovered 484 Tonnage recovered 1210 Duration project September 2015- October 2015 Waterdepth 4.500 - 5.000 meters Nr. of repeaters recovered 46
SAT-1
Cable description unarmored polyethylene coaxial Linking South Africa - Portugal Vessel MV Lida Captains A.W de Jong, A. Poortman, O. Dryha KM recovered 7000 Tonnage recovered 9100 Duration project April 2009 - December 2011 Waterdepth 2.500 - 6.500 meters Nr. of repeaters recovered 624
CANTAT-3
Cable description unarmored polyethylene coaxial Linking Nova Scotia - Germany (Sylt) Vessel MV Alida Captains A.W de Jong, O Dryha, K Magden KM recovered 1800 Tonnage recovered 2340 Duration project April 2012 - February 2013 Waterdepth 1.500 - 4.500 meters Remark including installation of End seal cap at Danish side Nr. of repeaters recovered 18
SAT-2
Cable description Fibre Optic Linking South Africa - Portugal Vessel MV Alida Captains A.W. de Jong, O Dryha, K.Magden KM recovered 2700 Tonnage recovered 3510 Duration project April 2013 - October 2013 Waterdepth 2.500-6.500 meters Nr. of repeaters recovered 24
HAW-2
Cable description unarmored polyethylene coaxial Linking San Louis Obispo (CA) - Hawaii Cable owner Subsea Environmental Services Ltd. Vessel CRS Rebecca Captains A.W. de Jong, O. Dryha, K. Magden KM recovered 2463 Tonnage recovered 3.201 Duration project September 2014 - February 2015 Waterdepth 4.500 - 5.160 meters Nr. of repeaters recovered 73
COLUMBUS-1
Cable description unarmored polyethylene coaxial Linking Venezuela - Spain Cable owner Subsea Environmental Services Ltd. Vessel CRS Rebecca Captains V. Babchynsky , O. Dryha KM planned 2635 Tonnage planned 3952,5 Duration project March 2015 - Oktober 2015 Waterdepth 4.500 - 5.000 meters Nr. of repeaters planned 154
COL-1
Cable description unarmored polyethylene coaxial Linking Venezuela - Spain Cable owner Subsea Environmental Services Ltd. Vessel CRS Rebecca Captains Konstantin Magden and Dmytro Ieroshin KM recovered 2.650 Tonnage recovered 4.771 Duration project August 2015 – March 2016 Waterdepth 3.600 -5.200 meters Nr. of repeaters recovered 224
FRANCE-MAROC-1
Cable description unarmored polyethyene coaxial Linking France - Portugal Cable owner Subsea Environmental Services Ltd. Vessel CRS Rebecca Captains K.Magden KM planned 375 Tonnage recovered 562,5 Duration project December 2015 – January 2016 Waterdepth 500 - 3.000 meters Nr. of repeaters planned 45
FRANCE-MAROC-2
Cable description unarmored polyethyene coaxial Linking France - Portugal Cable owner Subsea Environmental Services Ltd. Vessel CRS Rebecca Captains V. Babchynsky, K.Magden KM planned 325 Tonnage recovered 487,5 Duration project November 2015 Waterdepth 500 - 4.000 meters Nr. of repeaters planned 45
ICECAN-SCOTICE
Cable description Armored polyethylene coaxial cable Linking Scotland – Iceland - Greenland Vessel CRS Rebecca Captains Vadym Babchynsky KM planned 900 Tonnage recovered - Duration project 3 months Waterdepth - Nr. of repeaters planned -

Quality

CRS HOLLAND offers its customers end to end management of deep sea cable recovery operations (including crossings and end-seal solutions).

We work closely together with all major Telecom companies. CRS Holland is a full ICPC member and all our activities are performed in accordance with ICPC recommendations. We ensure stringent quality monitoring and work to the highest safety standards.

CRS Holland is proud to announce that it has received the ISO9001:2015 and the ISO14001:2015 certificates on their Cable Recovery Activities. These certifications were conducted in accordance with the QMS International GmbH auditing and certification procedures and is subject to regular surveillance audits.

Experience

CRS Holland’s management has extensive experience in the maritime and industrial sector, with a deep knowledge of cable transport, cable storage and deep sea cable recovery.

Under our management, more than 16.000 kilometres of deep sea submarine cable has been successfully recovered over the last years. All projects were delivered against strict deadlines in various oceans and weather conditions.

Focus

Our focus is on cost effective recovery of Out Of Service subsea cables which can either be used for destruction, raw materials(plastics, copper, aluminium and steel) for recycling purposes, or re-deployment of complete cable systems, including repeaters.

We offer cable owners a professional and cost-effective recovery service to turn their liabilities - retired subsea cables - into assets.

In remote communities, where lower capacity is sufficient, redeployment of cable systems can be a viable alternative for new submarine systems. Cost of cable and repeaters in new submarine cable systems can represent around 50% of the total project budget, so the re-use of cables and repeaters can reduce project costs substantially.

Commitment

CRS Holland is committed to cleaning up the oceans in a way that is both environmentally and economically solid.
Are you?

Fleet

The CRS Rebecca is a Conoship 5500 design, built in 2008 by Barkmeijer Stroobos - one of the leading shipyards in the Netherlands.

The CRS Rebecca had a major conversion in 2014 to make her suitable for cable recovery operations and is fully equipped with state-of the art equipment. The Cable Recovery Unit consists of: main winch, tensioners, bow chute, cable storage tanks and repeater storage. Full spec

Research

The case for submarine cable owners to recover their decomissioned cables.

We deep dived into three major reasons - economical, ethical and ecological - about why you should recover decommissioned cables. Read more

Working together

Why contract with CRS Holland and our partners?

Let us give you an insight to our working practises, experience and cost efficiency. Read more

Mission

CRS Holland is committed to cost effective and environmentally sound recovery and recycling of out-of-service deep sea cable systems. The company is dedicated to providing cable owners with end to end service and optimum earnings.

Vision

By continuously investing in new technology and best practices, CRS Holland is a solutions company, expanding its capabilities to effectively serve the full spectrum of recycling needs realized by its customers and the environment. CRS Holland will meet and exceed the expectations of each customer and will strive to cement its position as a leader in the recovery of out-of-service deep sea cable systems.

GUIDING VALUES

Delivering integrated management services to customers in a cost effective manner
Environmental awareness and protection
Maintaining a safe working environment
Providing superior customer service
Commitment to excellence in all aspects of operations
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publication date
21 sep '16
is exhibiting at Submarine Networks in S'pore 17 - 19 October. We have booth nr. 005 and present our view on Circularity in Out Of Service subsea cables and the very interesting applications and projects we are working on. Looking forward to meet you in S'pore........
publication date
08 jul '16
CRS Holland is proud to announce that it has received the ISO9001:2015 and the ISO14001:2015 certificates on their Cable Recovery Activities. These certifications were conducted in accordance with the QMS International GmbH auditing and certification procedures and is subject to regular surveillance audits.
publication date
18 may '16
The Challenge: Until now an estimated total of 30.000 km of cable has been recovered but still 94% of unused cables are lying on the seabed together with 72.000 repeaters and this number is growing every year. Routes are getting more and more congested, (potential) liabilities are increasing, political- and environmental climates are changing and this 'waste' represents a potential value of several billions of USD of metals and plastics.
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publication date
31 mar '16
CRS Holland is invited to give a presentation at the ICPC Plenary in Hamburg April 12-14. Our presentation is titled "Reduce congestion of Submarine Cables & Mining the Sea". A very interesting topic to present and discuss with leading partners in the submarine cable industry.Looking forward to an enthousiastic audiance!!
publication date
19 feb '16
Circle Economy is a cooperative, and together with our members and partners we work on projects on a company, sector or regional level that accelerate the transition towards a circular economy.
publication date
17 dec '15
Enkele duizenden kilometers aan oude communicatiekabels komen jaarlijks van oceaanbodems aan boord van een Nederlands schip.
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publication date
30 oct '15
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27 oct '15
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23 oct '15
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20 oct '15
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16 oct '15
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publication date
15 oct '15
CRS Holland is a fascinating business case and an excellent example of how circularity can be applied in areas where it would be otherwise least expected.
publication date
09 oct '15
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06 oct '15
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publication date
02 oct '15
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publication date
29 sep '15
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publication date
25 sep '15
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22 sep '15
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publication date
06 aug '15
The CRS Rebecca is working on the last kilometers of the COL-1 cable. on board now over 1.000 km of coaxial cable.WP/AGW we will finish this leg on August 10th.
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publication date
17 jun '15
has finalized succesfully the recovery and offload of the Columbus-1 cable owned by Subsea Environmntal Services. In total 1.400 km / 3.000 MT of obsolete co-axial cable was cleaned from the Ocean floor within agreed timetables and delivered in Amsterdam.
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publication date
23 apr '15
recovery in the Atlantic is going well!! We have our first 800 kilometres of COL-1 cable and STC repeaters on board and making progress. Vessel, equipment and crew are enthousiastic about progress being made.
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publication date
07 apr '15
we have signed a cable recovery agreement with our partner Subsea Environmental Services for the recovery of the Columbus-1 (COL-1). The COL-1 is a retired co-axial telecom cable connecting Venezuela and Spain laying at 4.500 - 5.000 meters waterdepth with a lenght of 1.700 kilometers.
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publication date
09 mar '15
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publication date
09 mar '15
CRS Holland just finalised the offloading of the HAW-2 cable into 40 FT containers in Colon (Panama). With our in-house developed, paired offload- and cutting line we were running 5 lines simultaneously. The complete HAW-2 cable is sectioned, containerized and ready for shipment.
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publication date
26 jan '15
Just finalised our first Cable Recovery project!! In total 2.400 km of out of service cable is recovered and stored on board. A great achievement in the short history of CRS Holland. We are committed to clean up the Oceans, we have just started with over 3.100 tons of plastics and metals.
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publication date
03 dec '14
13 22 november 2014, Wacht te kooi Door Tobias Pieffers Miljoenen kilometers telecommunicatie-kabels liggen er op de zeebodem. Die worden lang niet allemaal gebruikt, maar omdat verwijde-ring kostbaar en niet noodzakelijk is blij-ven de
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Arne de Jong
Friso Tammes

CRS Holland

Disketteweg 18 1033 NW Amsterdam The Netherlands +31 207 230 335
fullscreen
CRS Rebecca
CRS Rebecca

General Data Vessel
Name CRS Rebecca
Vessel Owner CRS Rebecca B.V.
Vessel Operator CRS Holland B.V.
Built 2008
Flag Netherlands
Port of registry Rotterdam
Call Sign PBON
IMO no. 9361108
Class Society Bureau Veritas
Deadweight Summer 5.622mt
Deadweight Winter 5.456mt
Summer Draft 6.12mtr Hatch type Pontoon
Length Over All 99.8mtr
Beam 14mtr
Max Air Draft 21mtr
GT 3.442Gt
NT 1.903Nt

General data Recovery Equipment
The winch system consists of a main winch and a tensioner. The main winch provides the main pulling force for recovery of the cable; the tensioner is providing provides the required auxiliary tension for the main winch and transports the recovered cable to the various cable tanks.

Specifications Main Winch
  • Drum winch with fixed fleeting knives (pay in/pay out)
  • 2000 mm drum diameter, 600 mm width
  • Hydraulic/electronic driven and controlled
  • Max pulling force 150 kN at 1.5 m/sec
  • Hydraulic controlled pay-out

Specifications Tensioner
  • 2 Linear cable engine
  • 2 wheel pairs
  • Hydraulic driven
  • 2,5 kN at 1.5 m/s
  • Wheel load adjustable 0 – 2,5 kN

Cable Holding Capacity
Vessel is equipped with 5 cable tanks. The maximum quantity of cable to be stored is approximately 4.000 m3 and 150 Repeaters.
Why contract with CRS Holland and our partners
Why contract with CRS Holland and our partners

Working practices
CRS Holland has a risk-averse approach to the recovery of cables and repeaters in order to minimize any potential set-backs.

CRS’ risk management procedures are as good as, if not better than, the standards and legislation set by the ICPC and insurers.

CRS works according the highest standards, using first class equipment and a highly qualified and trained staff.

CRS works to continuously improve its process and teams by investing in training, state-of- the art equipment and safety.

Experience
Over 16,500 km of cable has been recovered by the CRS crew since 2009, on behalf of various cable owners around the globe.

We are leaders in the recovery industry and have recovered cable from various oceans with 2 of our cable recovery vessels in deep waters.

It makes economical sense
We offer cable owners a professional and costeffective recovery service to turn their liabilities – retired subsea cables – into assets.
download the pdf
The case for submarine cable owners to recover their decomissioned cables
The case for submarine cable owners to recover their decomissioned cables

Economical
Telecommunication companies can earn money from resurfacing cables due to the revenues from selling the recovered materials being higher than the cost of recovery.

Telecommunication companies must maintain liability insurance for as long as their cables are in the sea and not recovered.

The recovery and re-laying of cable systems is significantly lower in cost than producing and laying new cables because it is faster to relay existing cables and the materials used (including recovery) cost much less than virgin materials.

Ethical
Recent bans on landfilling around the globe highlight the argument that leaving man-made materials on the earth for an indefinite period of time is no longer acceptable; the same argument can be made for the recovery and resurfacing of resources that are sunk into the seabed in the form of cables.

From a resource management point of view, the last phase of cable maintenance should be recovery.

Ecological
Subsea infrastructure contains significant amounts of materials (plastics & metals), which rely on finite resources that are becoming increasingly scarce.

The mining of the resources needed to produce virgin materials causes significant environmental impact that can be strongly reduced by using recycled content.

Parts of the infrastructure elements of sub sea cables (such as repeaters) include traces of radioactive materials that can have potentially damaging effects on sea life.
download the pdf